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Instructional Leadership

Our monthly Teaching and Learning Club took place on Thursday the 27th of February at lunch time. The focus for this meeting centered on the effective utilization of groupwork using Placemats and exploring peer assessment strategies such as Ghost walks and Two Stars and a Wish. We also explored assessment techniques including the application of success criteria and The Rule of Thumb technique. At Inver College active learning is central in our aim of putting the student at the heart of everything we do.  

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Teachers will continue to ensure that positive behaviour is given recognition through the school wide incentive scheme and classroom incentive schemes. The staff is committed to increasing communication between teachers and students and between school and home. Students will know when they have chosen a behaviour that is unacceptable. Our goal is to help children see that they are responsible for their behaviour and in control of themselves. The choice is always with the student.
 
The ability of the teacher and all school staff to prevent and respond to student misbehaviour determines whether or not meaningful classroom learning occurs.
This plan is based on the “Thinking and Caring Approach to Classroom Management” and on the premise that all children will misbehave at some time (Barry Bennett and Peter Smilanich).
Through the implementation of “Classroom Management: Thinking and Caring Approach”, teachers are encouraged to be reflective practitioners and to bring their practice to a conscious level. This will increase teacher understanding of how effective teachers prevent and respond to misbehaviour to create a learning environment that encourages student learning.
 
This policy is guided by the beliefs that:
  • Teachers are critical thinkers and life-long learners
  • Theory assists teachers in understanding why particular approaches work
  • Teacher change occurs most readily in a supportive environment
  1. Each member of the school community including all staff, students and parents/carers is expected to:
    • be punctual and professional
    • abide by the school code of conduct to help maintain a positive learning environment.
    • show Respect for Self, Respect for Others, Respect for Learning, Respect for the School and Respect for the Community.
  2. Each teacher will develop a classroom code of behaviour which will contribute to a positive learning environment. This code of behaviour will be communicated and discussed with the students in the first weeks of school. It will be reviewed frequently.
  3. Teachers will continue to ensure that positive behaviour is given recognition through the school wide incentive scheme and classroom incentive schemes. The staff is committed to increasing communication between teachers and students and between school and home.
    Students will know when they have chosen a behaviour that is unacceptable.
Our goal is to help children see that they are responsible for their behaviour and in control of themselves. The choice is always with the student.
 
Here are some documents giving more information
 
 
 

View these videos from Youtube below

 

 

In our most recent staff meeting we had an introductory session on The Instructional Leadership Programme and we focused on strategies such as the  the utilisation of Placemats and explored different types of peer assessment.

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The first Teaching and Learning Club was held this week and our staff actively engaged with Instructional Leadership concepts and strategies such as Framing Questions, Snowball Activity and the utilisation of the Traffic Lights located in students’ diaries.

In Inver College we value greatly the expertise and skill of our teachers and it is our aspiration to utilise peer collaboration to continue to develop and share the excellent teaching and learning practices within the school.

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What is Instructional Intelligence?


So what is meant by the term “Instructional Intelligence”?  In its literal sense, the notion relates to the extent to which teachers are “intelligent” about their instructional behaviour; or in other words, the manner in which teachers consciously or overtly modify their instructional actions so as to maximise the impact on student learning.  More broadly, the theory may be defined as the conscious and deliberate utilisation by the teacher of a range of interventions or teacher actions categorised as skills, tactics and strategies that impact positively on student learning in the classroom, based on extensive research into how students learn.  In addition, the theory fosters in teachers a greater awareness of how their actions can impact on critical factors or concepts that affect student learning, such as motivation, novelty, authenticity, safety and accountability. Furthermore, teachers who are instructionally intelligent are acquainted with the extent to which learning may be affected by a range of instructional organisers such as diverse learning styles, multiple intelligences, brain research, ethnicity, gender or “at risk” environments.

Collectively, the integration of these italicised categories may be defined as pedagogy.   While skills, tactics and strategies may be classified or defined as discrete groupings, the ability of the teacher to weave these processes together in a thoughtful manner so as to create a more powerful learning environment constitutes what Bennett characterises as the art of teaching.  In order to develop a greater appreciation of the potential of Instructional Intelligence, it may be useful to look at each of these categories in more detail.

For more information: https://www.instructionalleadership.ie/index.php/il-ireland/the-origins-of-the-instructional-leadership-programme-in-ireland

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